As we discussed in the last two parts of this blog series, to make your office look polished and finished, you need to have art and accessories as part of it. Today we will discuss:

What Piece of Art Works

Selection

Selecting artwork to complement your space can be approached in a few ways. Once you know the theme of the art of each zone, one common approach is to select artwork that blends with the colors of the furnishings and surrounding finishes. Another approach is to select artwork that is the highlight or accent by using vibrant colors or high contrasts.

Chiropractic Office Art

Chiropractic Office Art

Size and proportion play important roles in selecting your artwork as well. Art must be in proportion to the room and the items within the room. Common errors in art selection are art that is too small or too large, or the several art pieces together are spread out too far apart without a rhythm or good composition.

Chiropractic Office Art

You can change the proportion of a poster/print by matting and framing it, increasing the size of something that otherwise would be too small. Using a series of small pieces grouped together can create a feel of one large piece. Such as, if you need a large horizontal piece, find an artist series of two, three or four pieces that can be mounted side by side with about 3 to 8 inches apart, depending on the size of the actual item. This will read as one piece of art.

Chiropractic Office Art

Installation

So hanging art at the wrong height is probably the biggest mistake we see. Artwork should be hung at common eye level. By industry standards, the common eye level is 60 inches “on center” above the finished floor. This means that you measure 60” above the floor and the center of your artwork should align with that mark at 60 inches. There is actually a range that varies from 54” to 64” based on circumstances and design intent. There are some instances when you can hang artwork below common eye level, such as a very tall piece that goes up almost to the ceiling. Also, by changing the common eye level mark higher or lower, you can direct people, in a sense, to sit or stand. If you desire people to stand, raise the common eye level; if you desire people to sit, lower it. But be intentional about it.

Chiropractic Office Art

Any professional that hangs art always hangs art by two points. Artwork with  “O” or “D” rings on each side of the frame can be very strategic to position. Wire hanging can be a little easier to hang and position. The wire is held in place with two hooks spread apart  enough so it helps to balance the picture when you need to adjust it or align it.

Chiropractic Office Art

If you do have to hang a picture with a single hook in the middle, one trick is to take a piece of tape and roll it to create a sticky ball. Attach the tape at the bottom left or bottom right corner frame and adhere it to the wall. This will help fix it in place, and keep it from moving every time the wind blows. When pictures are not level and always need adjusting, especially after cleaning, they create an untidy, unkempt look, much like people with untied shoes.

Chiropractic Office Art

The finishing touches will put the icing on the cake on the space and image you desire. We hope these article have helped you.  If you want to see if we can help you more, just give us a call.

CrossFields specializes at helping your office represent your desired image and creating a welcoming culture. Contact us to help you with the design or layout of your next office.

Read the other blogs in this series:

Carolyn Boldt

With over 30 years of experience, Carolyn has gained complete understanding of every aspect of the commercial interior industry. Her experience includes turnkey, full-service architectural interior design; extensive program development studies (PDS), feasibility studies, design programs , planning studies and space planning; development of facility standards and master plans; creative impact statements for retail, hospitality and corporate; graphic identity packages; sustainable design; as well as complete facility start-ups and relocation management.

She has a Bachelors of Science – Interior Design, University of Texas at Austin, 1980, is a Registered Designer, a LEED Accredited Professional, NCIDQ Certified, and Professional Member of IIDA/International Interior Design Association and GAIDP/Georgia Association of Professional Interior Designers.